About

SOUL12 is an affordable, hands-on, and productive summer school at a fun place. 

Besides learning new things and meeting interesting people, you will publish your findings in a journal and you will have a great time, without breaking the bank.

SOUL: School on Open and Usable Learning, takes place from July 8th to July 15th 2012. 

SOUL is focused on PhD students and on early-career researchers who are interested to network and to produce collaborative results on usable learning with experts in the field. We target audience that has background in informatics, education, psychology, sociology, design, but we also welcome participants from other related disciplines.

The summer school provides a learning environment where participants get opportunities to: develop their research skills; increase their knowledge base; collaborate with others in their own and complementary research areas; have access to experts in the field; discuss their own work; and get the opportunity to publish the outcome of their upcoming research in a special issue of an established journal.

The program includes lectures from a broad range of domains that contribute to advancing the field of Open and Usable Learning. The main research topics are: Serious video-games, video (lectures and CMC), tangibles, informal learning in museums, e-books, and open-source approaches. The program also includes practical and methodological workshops and opportunities for doctoral candidates to get external feedback by peers and experts. 

SOUL12: Summer School on Open and Usable Learning is organized by the Informatics in Humanistic and Social Sciences LabIonian ACM Student Chapter and Deparment of InformaticsIonian University in Corfu, Greece and focuses on combining innovations in educational technologies with advanced learning procedures, techniques, tools and alternative practices.

SOUL12 is a follow-up to schoolit10: Adopting and Adapting ICT in Greek Schools in 2010 and schoolit11: Coping with ICT in Greek Schools in 2011. SOUL has been motivated by the research performed in the Marie Curie project CULT